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Author (up) Elder, H pdf  doi
  Title Te Waka Kuaka and Te Waka Oranga. Working with Whānau to Improve Outcomes Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 16 pp  
  Keywords whānau, hauora, healing, Māori, cultural practices, traumatic brain injury, recovery, needs assessment  
  Abstract The role of whānau (extended families) is recognised as an essential aspect of hauora (wellbeing) for Maori, who are over represented in populations where there is injury or insult to the brain. Whānau mātauranga (knowledge systems) are a potent resource for enhancing recovery outcomes. This approach, based on Rangahau Kaupapa Māori (research by Māori for Māori) takes the view that by locating the whānau within their own culturally determined knowledge systems and optimising their integral role in the delivery of culturally required interventions, the recovery experience will be enhanced, and they will feel a greater sense of ease and self-determination in the process of their own healing. Te Waka Oranga describes a process of bringing together whānau knowledge, skills, and feelings, with health workers’ knowledge, skills, and feelings in the context of identifying recovery destinations they collectively want to bring forward in order to improve the experience of recovery and to improve outcomes for whānau using the metaphor of a waka. It is also hypothesised that this approach will improve the experience of the health workers. Te Waka Kuaka is a Māori cultural needs assessment tool that has been developed to further guide this work, which uses the metaphor of a flock of godwits. This paper describes the development of a combined approach, using these two tools, with whānau at the centre. This illustrates in both theory and praxis a culturally defined way of bringing whānau resources to the fore to promote whānau healing. While originally designed to address issues in the area of traumatic brain injury, it is likely that this way of working may also have wider application in the areas of insult to the brain such as mental health, addictions, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Key Points

1 How to think about and apply Māori concepts of health in practice.

2 Recognising the importance of assessing whānau cultural needs.

3 Understanding the concept of wairua.

4 The importance of making time for cultural practices of engagement.

5 Increased awareness of mātauranga Māori and use of the whānau

mātauranga resources.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis Ph.D. thesis  
  Publisher Australian and New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy 2017, 38, 27–42 Place of Publication Editor  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number TRM @ admin @ Serial 1166  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Gifford, H., Cvitanovic, L., Boulton, A., Batten, L. url 
  Title Constructing prevention programmed with a Māori health service provider view Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Chronic conditions, prevention, Māori health services, Indigenous  
  Abstract Mainstream approaches to chronic condition management and prevention inadequately address the needs of Māori, the Indigenous people of New Zealand. Māori health service providers (MHSPs) are uniquely placed to address the critical gap in the prevention of chronic conditions. In this paper, we report qualitative research findings investigating how prevention was being modelled, practiced and measured in selected MHSP settings. Results indicate barriers to achieving wellbeing through health service delivery. The dominant individualistic, medical conditions-focused discourse, along with responding to acute need, is a driver of service delivery norms. There are examples of shifts in organisational structure and delivery configurations that demonstrate that these norms are being challenged and reframed, in some form, by MHSPs. Consolidation of these approaches requires significant work and increased resources as well as a broader systems-level response that prioritises prevention.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number TRM @ admin @ Serial 1259  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Kerekere, E pdf 
  Title Part of the Whānau, The Emergence of Takatāpui Identity, He Whariki Takatāpui Type Abstract
  Year 2017 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 215 pp  
  Keywords Takatāpui, whakawāhine, lesbian, resilience, identity, tūpuna, health,  
  Abstract Since the early 1980s, Māori who are whakawāhine, tangata ira tāne, lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, intersex or queer have increasingly adopted the identity of ‘takatāpui’ – a traditional Māori term meaning ‘intimate companion of the same sex.’ As the first study on takatāpui identity and well-being, this is fashioned as a Whāriki Takatāpui; a woven mat which lays the foundation for future research and advocacy. Kaupapa Māori research provides the tools for this task while Kaupapa Māori theory ensures the harvest of Māori narratives is underpinned by te reo, tikanga and mātauranga – Māori language, culture and knowledges. The preparation of weaving materials is represented by Mana Wāhine; which considers whakapapa (genealogy), intersectional colonial oppression with an artistic approach to analysing whakataukī (historical metaphor). Mana Motuhake represents the design of the Whāriki; the colours and patterns emanating from the subjective experiences of six leaders who have embraced a takatāpui identity. Te Whare Tapa Whā represents weaving together takatāpui health and well-being in response to the issues and discrimination they face. Oral history interviews were held with takatāpui participants who reflected a diversity of iwi, geographical location, gender identities and sexualities and, at the time of interview, ranged from 17 to 68 years of age. In order to gain insight into the perception of whānau with takatāpui members, semi structured interviews were also held with two kuia (female elders) and 12 whānau members of the takatāpui rangatahi (young people) interviewed. In total 27 participants were interviewed in three stages over four years. Their responses were recorded, transcribed then analysed based on the elements of the Whāriki Takatāpui framework. Despite colonial efforts to remove historical trace, this study reveals new evidence of takatāpui behaviour within traditional Māori narratives. It finds that takatāpui identity is predicated on Māori identity with a spiritual connection to takatāpui tūpuna (ancestors) that is crucial in addressing the discrimination they may face within their whānau and culture. It identifies the range of issues that impact on takatāpui health and well-being while highlighting the creative and strength-based manner in which takatāpui build resilience and connection through identity.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis Master's thesis  
  Publisher Victoria University Place of Publication Wellington Editor  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number TRM @ admin @ Serial 1168  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Kingi, T., Russell, L., Ashby, W., et al. pdf 
  Title Mā te mātau, ka ora: The use of traditional Indigenous knowledge to support contemporary rangatahi Māori who self-injure Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication New Zealand Journal of Psychology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 46 Issue 3 Pages 137-145  
  Keywords Self-Injury, Rangatahi Māori, Adolescents, Indigenous peoples, Culture, Ethnic minorities  
  Abstract International understanding of, and interventions for, self-injury are grounded in definitions and models that are based on a worldview that, for some rangatahi Māori (Māori youth), differ from their own lived realities. In this paper we explore the potential that traditional knowledge has for enabling rangatahi and whānau (families) to understand self-injury within a culturally-relevant context. Kōrero tuku iho (traditions or stories of the past) are affirming of behaviours that, in modern society, would be considered self-injury. These kōrero tuku iho have been passed down over generations and, as such, are grounded in traditional Māori values and beliefs. This knowledge can be applied to the behaviours rangatahi Māori engage in and provide a culturally-grounded context, rationale and mechanisms for healing when rangatahi self-injure. Learning of these behaviours facilitates an opportunity for rangatahi to reconnect and learn more about their culture.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Auckland Editor  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1211  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Lawson-Te Aho, Keri, Rose. url 
  Title The case of Re-framing Māori Suicide Prevention Research in Aotearoa/New Zealand: Applying Lessons from Indigenous Suicide Prevention Research Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Indigenous Research Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 6 Issue 2017 Pages 18 pp  
  Keywords Māori Suicide Prevention Research Aotearoa LGBTIQ Indigenous Racism  
  Abstract The aim of this paper is to present a case for reframing Māori suicide prevention research away from a strong emphasis on clinical research towards research that is more self-determining and historically and culturally contextualised. Rising levels of indigenous suicide have produced an intensified global focus on suicide prevention in indigenous, migrant and LGBTIQ populations.

Suicide research in Aotearoa/New Zealand has largely disregarded the potential explanatory power of historical trauma and the inter-generational transfer of collective suffering on Māori suicide levels. Similarly, the effects of regular exposure to racism, daily micro-aggressions and structural violence are often overlooked as explanatory of Māori suicide. Instead, Māori suicide is generally viewed through a pathological, agentic and individualistic lens and Māori suicide prevention efforts framed and informed by a risk factor discursive minimising the historical and contemporary outcomes of pervasive and pernicious histories under colonisation. This paper describes Māori suicide prevention research as a body of knowledge dominated by Western mono-cultural and a/historicised analysis. Such research has overwhelmingly informed Māori suicide prevention strategies and policies for thirty years. However, recent innovations in Māori suicide prevention research which take into account Māori imperatives for self-determination and re-claiming the healing potential of cultural sovereignty are considered and the case for a new frame that enables a more comprehensive, accurate analysis of suicide is proposed.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number TRM @ admin @ Serial 1255  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) McClintock, K., McClintock, R. pdf 
  Title Hoea te waka: Indigenous suicide prevention outcomes framework and evaluation processes – Part 1 Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Indigenous Wellbeing Te Mauri Pimatisiwin Abbreviated Journal JIW  
  Volume 2 Issue 2 Pages 76 pp.  
  Keywords Suicide prevention, Māori community, outcomes framework.  
  Abstract In 2014, the first dedicated national Māori Suicide prevention approach coupled with a Pasifika programme was launched, profiled as the Waka Hourua National Suicide Prevention Programme 2014 – 2017 funded by the Ministry of Health. Te Rau Matatini, a national Māori non-government organisation and their Pasifika partner organisation Le Va, established and offered the programme. The “Hoea te waka: Indigenous suicide prevention outcomes framework and evaluation processes” article provides a summation of the outcomes framework and evaluation methodology utilised for the Waka Hourua National Suicide Prevention Programme 2014 – 2017 with particular focus on the 47 Māori community fund projects.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Te Rau Matatini Place of Publication Wellington Editor  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number TRM @ admin @ Serial 1244  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) McClintock, K., McClintock, R., Sewell, T., Sewell, J., Martin-Smith, V., Elkington, A., Morris, T., Korau, T., Brown, B., McRae, O. pdf 
  Title Eke panuku eke Tangaroa: Evaluation of Waka Hourua, Māori community suicide prevention projects – Part 2 Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Indigenous Wellbeing Te Mauri Pimatisiwin Abbreviated Journal JIW  
  Volume 2 Issue 2 Pages 32 pp.  
  Keywords Suicide prevention, Māori community, outcomes framework, secure rangatahi, resilient communities, nurturing whānau, confident rangatahi, wellbeing, strengths-based.  
  Abstract This article provides a summation of the provision of the Māori community fund of the Waka Hourua Māori and Pasifika Suicide Prevention Programme. It presents brief narratives of the 47 Māori community projects funded through the Waka Hourua Māori and Pasifika Suicide Prevention fund. This article also the achievements of these initiatives, located under the three goals of the Waka Hourua outcomes framework:

Goal one – Te Rau Matatini informed, cohesive and resilient communities;

Goal two – strong, secure and nurturing whānau (family); and

Goal three, safe, confident and Te Rau Matatini engaged rangatahi (youth).

The immediate impacts of the Waka Hourua 47 Māori community projects are acknowledged in the reports as active participation, positive Te Rau Matatini learning and the attainment of new knowledge that by their own accounts, strengthened suicide prevention in their many communities for whānau and rangatahi. Also, embedded in the 47 reports are notions that meeting community, whānau and rangatahi aspirations, ensuring positive cultural involvement and participating in strength based experiences contribute to health and wellbeing and therefore increases the possibility of suicide prevention.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Te Rau Matatini Place of Publication Wellington Editor  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number TRM @ admin @ Serial 1246  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Moeke-Maxwell, T., Nikora, L.M. pdf 
  Title Wairua Manuake – Flight of the Wairua: Māori end of life preparation Type Abstract
  Year 2017 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 25 pp.  
  Keywords kaumatua, whānau, dying, indigenous, palliative, manaakitanga, whanaungatanga, wairuatanga, karakia  
  Abstract The introduction sets out to contribute a more nuanced view of older people’s informal care (Chappell & Reid, 2002; Rowland, Hanratty, Pilling, Van den berg, & Grande, 2017) by acknowledging and celebrating the various contributions that Maori whānau (family including immediate and extended kin) make as end of life carers of their own. Whānau care and support is pivotal in the care of ill and dying kaumātua (older men or women) (Moeke-Maxwell, Nikora, & Te Awekotuku, 2013; Wiles, 2011). We ask, what happens during the end of life trajectory that provides the best conditions for Māori whānau to support the transition of the dying kaumātua’s wairua (spirit) at time of death? What factors might challenge this process? Understanding the importance of indigenous peoples’ experiences at the end of life can contribute to a wider incentive to improve health and palliative care, no matter where someone lives or dies.

Māori subscribe to many narratives to explain what occurs in and through the process of dying and death. Whānau carers and other members make a significant contribution to the physical and spiritual wellbeing of ill and dying kaumātua (elderly relative(s)) (Moeke-Maxwell, Nikora, & Te Awekotuku, 2014; Wiles, 2011). They bring to the challenge actions driven by pragmatism, necessity and contemporary health knowledge as well as Māori customary beliefs and practices. In this chapter, we set out to identify, describe and theorise a traditional Māori narrative apparent amongst a range of conversational engagements we had with whānau members who cared for and supported a kaumātua who had a life limiting illness. We begin by briefly considering Māori cosmological beliefs, the Māori afterlife and introduce the concepts of mauri and wairua; we consider the notion of tapu as a guiding framework for whānau care practices and discuss these in relation to manaakitanga, whanaungatanga, karakia and wairuatanga which we define later in this opening section.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number TRM @ admin @ Serial 1190  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Waigth, Simon pdf 
  Title Mā te Whānau, ka Ora ai te Tangata: Māori Experiences in Recovery from Addiction Type Report
  Year 2017 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages pp 113  
  Keywords Drug and Alcohol Addiction Māori Health Wellbeing  
  Abstract Drug and alcohol addiction is a critical issue in Aotearoa New Zealand, and the over-representation of the indigenous population is of real concern. Currently, there are a number of addiction treatment options available but there is a notable lack of interventions underpinned by Māori models of health and well-being. Higher Ground, a residential addiction treatment facility in Auckland, offers clients an opportunity to participate in an adjunctive, Māori-centred group. This research aimed to explore the recovery experiences of past Māori residents and how the whānau group contributed to their recovery. Semi-structured interviews with 18 participants were conducted. Thematic analysis of transcripts identified five themes and nine subthemes. The themes were: learning how to transition from treatment to the community; understanding myself and understanding addiction; making changes to the relational aspects of life; strengthening my Māori identity; connecting to spirituality in recovery. Overall the findings revealed that participants managed recovery in some respects in similar ways to those who participate in mainstream programmes, and in other respects, in ways unique to their experience as Māori and their experience in the whānau group. This research supports extending the concept of recovery and treatment, especially for Māori, to include non-abstinence factors such as relational reintegration and identity development. This is the first study to explore the recovery experiences of Māori having participated in a culturally consistent group during addiction treatment. Therefore, it makes a unique contribution to both the theory and practice of addiction treatment and recovery in Aotearoa New Zealand.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis Ph.D. thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number TRM @ admin @ Serial 1269  
Permanent link to this record
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