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Author (up) Kingi, T., Russell, L., Ashby, W., et al. pdf 
  Title Mā te mātau, ka ora: The use of traditional Indigenous knowledge to support contemporary rangatahi Māori who self-injure Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication New Zealand Journal of Psychology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 46 Issue 3 Pages 137-145  
  Keywords Self-Injury, Rangatahi Māori, Adolescents, Indigenous peoples, Culture, Ethnic minorities  
  Abstract International understanding of, and interventions for, self-injury are grounded in definitions and models that are based on a worldview that, for some rangatahi Māori (Māori youth), differ from their own lived realities. In this paper we explore the potential that traditional knowledge has for enabling rangatahi and whānau (families) to understand self-injury within a culturally-relevant context. Kōrero tuku iho (traditions or stories of the past) are affirming of behaviours that, in modern society, would be considered self-injury. These kōrero tuku iho have been passed down over generations and, as such, are grounded in traditional Māori values and beliefs. This knowledge can be applied to the behaviours rangatahi Māori engage in and provide a culturally-grounded context, rationale and mechanisms for healing when rangatahi self-injure. Learning of these behaviours facilitates an opportunity for rangatahi to reconnect and learn more about their culture.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Auckland Editor  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1211  
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