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Author (up) Moeke-Maxwell, T., Nikora, L.M. pdf 
  Title Wairua Manuake – Flight of the Wairua: Māori end of life preparation Type Abstract
  Year 2017 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 25 pp.  
  Keywords kaumatua, whānau, dying, indigenous, palliative, manaakitanga, whanaungatanga, wairuatanga, karakia  
  Abstract The introduction sets out to contribute a more nuanced view of older people’s informal care (Chappell & Reid, 2002; Rowland, Hanratty, Pilling, Van den berg, & Grande, 2017) by acknowledging and celebrating the various contributions that Maori whānau (family including immediate and extended kin) make as end of life carers of their own. Whānau care and support is pivotal in the care of ill and dying kaumātua (older men or women) (Moeke-Maxwell, Nikora, & Te Awekotuku, 2013; Wiles, 2011). We ask, what happens during the end of life trajectory that provides the best conditions for Māori whānau to support the transition of the dying kaumātua’s wairua (spirit) at time of death? What factors might challenge this process? Understanding the importance of indigenous peoples’ experiences at the end of life can contribute to a wider incentive to improve health and palliative care, no matter where someone lives or dies.

Māori subscribe to many narratives to explain what occurs in and through the process of dying and death. Whānau carers and other members make a significant contribution to the physical and spiritual wellbeing of ill and dying kaumātua (elderly relative(s)) (Moeke-Maxwell, Nikora, & Te Awekotuku, 2014; Wiles, 2011). They bring to the challenge actions driven by pragmatism, necessity and contemporary health knowledge as well as Māori customary beliefs and practices. In this chapter, we set out to identify, describe and theorise a traditional Māori narrative apparent amongst a range of conversational engagements we had with whānau members who cared for and supported a kaumātua who had a life limiting illness. We begin by briefly considering Māori cosmological beliefs, the Māori afterlife and introduce the concepts of mauri and wairua; we consider the notion of tapu as a guiding framework for whānau care practices and discuss these in relation to manaakitanga, whanaungatanga, karakia and wairuatanga which we define later in this opening section.
 
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  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number TRM @ admin @ Serial 1190  
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