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Author (up) Wilson, D,L. pdf 
  Title Through The Looking Glass: Nurses’ Responses to Women Experiencing Partner Abuse Type Journal Article
  Year 1997 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 143 pp  
  Keywords Nurses, battered women, partner abuse, violence, looking glass  
  Abstract Battered women are referred to as a ‘health problem in disguise’, yet they generally go unrecognised or are ignored by health professionals, including nurses. The aim of this study was to describe nurses’ responses to women presenting to emergency departments and general practices with injuries suggestive of partner abuse. A qualitative research design, using semi-structured interviews to gather data from six participants was undertaken. Grounded theory guided the analysis of data, revealing that nurses did not identify or respond effectively to battered women. A core category The Looking Glass, describes the differing perspectives nurses have when responding to battered women. The themes Not Seeing, Seeing But Not Seeing, and Seeing But Acting Ineffectively describe the differing responses of nurses to women experiencing partner abuse. The needs of nurses to respond effectively are outlined in a further theme Seeing For Effective Action. Educational Preparation is necessary to develop knowledge and skills related to partner abuse, while Workplace Assistance provides guidance to respond through the use of protocols, and support for personal and professional development. Improving the effectiveness of nurses in order to meet the needs of battered women is essential in reducing not only the personal costs to the women themselves, but in reducing the health care costs. Implications and recommendations for the education, practice, and further research are made.  
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  Corporate Author Thesis Master's thesis  
  Publisher Department of Primary Health Care & General Practice, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Otago Place of Publication Palmerston North Editor  
  Notes Copyright is owned by the Author of the thesis. Permission is given for a copy to be downloaded by an individual for the purpose of research and private study only. The thesis may not be reproduced elsewhere without the permission of the Author. Approved yes  
  Call Number TRM @ admin @ Serial 1164  
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