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Author (up) McClintock, K. pdf 
  Title Te Tomokanga : acceptable child and adolescent mental health services for Māori in Aotearoa (New Zealand) Type Report
  Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 241 pp  
  Keywords Children; Māori; Mental health services; Youth; Adolescent; Rangatahi; Mental Health workers; Kaupapa Maori services  
  Abstract Whakarāpoto: Abstract Aim My aim was to investigate and compare the acceptability of mainstream, bicultural and kaupapa Māori Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) access and delivery to young Māori and their whānau. I have also explored what wouldconstitute a good service for Māori as defined by Māori. Method A kaupapa Māori (Māori driven) research paradigm, based on the Pōwhiri process of engagement and participation guided both the quantitative and qualitative research approaches. The study involved three phases which included the:i) Te Ara Whanui, a questionnaire based quantitative phase with participants using Te Tomokanga, a reliable, validated survey modified for this study, from the Youth Services Survey for Families (YSSF)2.ii) Whaia te Ara Whanui, a sequential whānau interview based qualitative phase that involved self chosen participants, respondents from the Te Ara Whanui phase; and iii) Te Hononga, a concurrent whānau interview based qualitative phase that involved self chosen participants who only consented to a face to face interview. Results & Discussion The Te Tomokanga survey was completed by 168 respondents out of 1362 eligible for participation from the six District Health Boards (DHBs) CAMHS of the Midland health region3. The low response rate occurred after mailing out information. This may mean that mailing out to Māori may not be an effective process. It is possible that Māori respond better to face to face contact and people they know and this is likely to be a more effective process of engagement as was the case in this study.1 Whānau, parents and caregivers are terms used interchangeably in this thesis.2 This survey was used to measure satisfication with CAMHS in the United States (Riley & Stromberg, 2001). I contacted Dr Molly Brunk who developed the YSSF and she agreed for me to make adaptions to the YSS_F for the purpose of this study.3 Midlands health region includes Waikato, Taranaki, Lakes, Bay of Plenty and Tai Rawhiti DHBsiii The majority of surveys (69.70%) were completed through telephone follow up with the whānau than through just mailing out the survey. Given these results telephone contact with whānau maybe a more effective process of connection than mail outs.I have shown through the survey, although with some constraints, that the respondants in this study had similiar levels of acceptance of the three service types; mainstream, bicultural and kaupapa Māori. For these whānau, acceptability of services was shown to be related to whānau involvement, service delivery that takes into account cultural differences, accessible clinic venues for appointments and understanding that medication would help, all at statistically significant levels.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis Ph.D. thesis  
  Publisher University of Auckland Place of Publication Editor  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number TRM @ admin @ McClintock2009 Serial 1106  
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